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First-Hand Account Of The Carnage In Boston [AUDIO]

By SARAH PEPPER, HOT 95-7

Steve was in the medical tent at the time the bombs went off near the finish line of the Boston Marathon on Monday. As soon as he and his group returned back to their hotel, they went into lock down.

Steve, a father of a 7-year-old son, arrived back in Houston early Tuesday morning and called us let us know everyone on his team is okay and gave us a first-hand account of what he saw.
spacer1 First Hand Account Of The Carnage In Boston [AUDIO]

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Steve says what happened Monday “puts things into perspective” as it has done for so many people in this country.  He had not had a chance yet to call his son but assured us when he did he would tell him how much he loves him.

He was in the medical tent when the first explosion happened. What did you think?  “I know it is such an overused word, surreal. What was that? Cant be a bomb. The other one came 10 seconds after.”

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After the first explosion the scene changed dramatically from one of triumph and accomplishment as racers crossed the finish line to that of despair, chaos with injuries and blood everywhere.

“People were running both ways – any direction,” Steve said. “It was quite a scene, for sure.”

If there any positives to come out of this entire situation, they are the stories about the heroes in Boston – the first responders, firefighters, police officers, emergency medical technicians, nurses and doctors, and even civilians, who rushed to the scene to help the wounded.

“The emergency personal responded so well,”  Steve said.

The quickness in their response kept so many out of harm’s way, he added.

After the second explosion, which he said was just 10 seconds after the first one, Steve was in shock.

“It took me about five minutes of standing on the street,” he said about the time that elapsed before he decided to move indoors.

Once he was in the hotel, the building was shut down, allowing nobody to enter or leave.

Luckily, Steve is back in Houston.  He is safe. His team is safe. However, the images of the carnage in Boston “will always be in the back of my mind.”

He will be back to run the Houston Marathon. He says fear will not deter him, and that seems to be the sentiment from a lot of Houstonians. They will be there in January to run and to honor those in Boston with every step of their 26.2 mile journey.

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